[Last Film I Saw] I Am Number Four (2011)

Title: I Am Number Four
Year: 2011
Language: English
Country: USA
Genre: Sci-Fi
Director: D.J. Caruso
Writers:
Alfred Gough
Miles Millar
Marti Noxon
Pittacus Lore
Music: Trevor Rabin
Cinematography: Guillermo Navarro
Cast:
Alex Pettyfer
Timothy Olyphant
Teresa Palmer
Dianna Agron
Callan McAuliffe
Kevin Durand
Jake Abel
Rating: 4.7/10

I cannot take it too serious to this film because it was my wayward intention to watch some lightweight film just for a pop-corn revelry, so as it was the case, I should not be too whiny about it.

To be honestly surprised, most of the time the film failed to stultify me, nevertheless, nothing spectacular either. The plot is tawdry with monsters, aliens, shapeshifter, of course corny human beings, which has bugged me since the beginning is the sequential alien-slaughter, which is rather inane and inexplicable (why bother? Right? They’re aliens, who have their own reasons and principles which is beyond mankind’s shallow imaginations).

The attraction between No. 4 and his artsy love-interest is scant, especially Dianna Agron’s sleepwalking existence severely aggravates the incompatible aura whenever the two strolls together, thankful but a tad late to the arrival of No. 6 (a delightful eye-candy Teresa Palmer) efficiently escalates the kick-ass index and rescues the film from the dormant mode, although both Alex Pettyfer, Callan McAuliffe and Palmer’s sex appeal is unforgivably underused (I am counting Ms. Agron out under this condition and meanwhile testifying that myself is not a fervent Glee admirer either). Also my sincere sympathy toward Timothy Olyphant, his breakthrough has never ever arrived, even though he is better than most of his peers.

Judging by its not so weighty budget, the film services well as a spring season, children-targeted entertainment, the tempo is fine and the high-light final skirmish is immaturely diverting. Through the young cast, it is easy to detect an explicit ambition to create a sci-fi version of Twilight Sega, but the box office feedback was disappointing, by now a sequel seems to be not so surefire.

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