[Last Film I Saw] Topkapi (1964)

Topkapi

Title: Topkapi
Year: 1964
Country: USA
Language: English, French, Turkish
Genre: Adventure, Crime
Director: Jules Dassin
Writers:
Sonja Danischewsky
Eric Ambler
Music: Manos Hatzidakis
Cinematography: Henri Alekan
Cast:
Melina Mercouri
Peter Ustinov
Maximilian Schell
Robert Morley
Gilles Ségal
Akim Tamiroff
Jess Hahn
Titos Vandis
Ege Ernart
Jules Dassin
Senih Orkan
Ahmet Danyal Topatan
Despo Diamantidou
Rating: 7.2/10

My second Jules Dassin’s film after NIGHT AND THE CITY (1950), and out of my expectation it’s an exotic Turkish heist adventurer with a blithe tone and meticulous detail-solidification with regard to the theft action.

The film starts with a tawdry but foxy Melina Mercouri (Dassin’s muse and future wife) enigmatically introducing her craving to steal the most precious jewelled dagger from Topkapi museum, her kitschy costume and the settings are antiquated enough to divert the film into a burlesque frivolousness, but when her entire team assembles (including the male-counterpart mastermind Maximilian Schell), with an additional interlope, a small-con “schmo” (the Oscar-winning Peter Ustinov), the film regains its vigour and flair in its strongest form to manoeuvre a seamless treasure-replacement theft, benchmarks an exemplar of its genre which haven’t been overshadowed since then, the escape strategy during a Turkish old-wrestling (Kırkpınar) pageantry is no less pleasant to watch against the trickery’s predictability, and far more thrilling is the actual stunts which thoroughly generate a gravitating magnetism on the screen lest as little as one needle’s dropping would scupper the plan. But the pathos-bathos irrefutably comes in the end, in the public media, where no one should dare wrote an ode to theft, no matter how benevolent those convicts are in person, thus the finale has to be a received compromise which still is in line with the filmic light-hearted air.

Ustinov, is so congenital and always oozes a screen-friendly affability and warmth in his presence, whose second Oscar win of a borderline supporting role is well-earned by lifting the entertainment-heavy film onto a stratum of character-engaging experience. An appearance combo of Debra Messing and Anne Bancroft, the nymphomaniac Melina Mercouri stands still as the shallow and narrow-written role of an anti-femme fatale brain, and a gorgeous Maximilian Schell is shamefully eclipsed by his chubby sidekick, whose circumscribed performance nevertheless at least arouse my curiosity to delve into his filmography a bit deeper.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s